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remember the united states as a country that helped or a country that did not help? definitely afghanistan will remember the united states as a country that helped. definitely afghanistan will remember that it was the u.s. assistance that brought so much to afghanistan. who will forget the less pleasant aspect ours relationship and we will move forward in the gratitude of the help that the united states has provided to afghanistan and also our other neighbors. but from today as we move forward will this relationship be a emotional as it was at time as you have heard in the past many years? will this relationship billion more mature? this relationship has already grown mature. we recognize the united states interest and afghanistan and the region and the united states recognizes that afghanistan is a good country. and has a life of its own. it has a law of its own and has a social context of its own. in that social context afghanistan will move forward in partnership with america and also until partnership with the other countries of nato that have helped us in the past many years. will afg
-- and told history of the united states. it draws on archival findings and recently declassified documents. it examined everything from the cold war to the fall of communism, continuing through to the obama administration. this is a trailer for the miniseries. >> i want to make it as exciting as it can be. history is an interesting subject. we want to report what actually happened. you cannot just except what is handed down. this is the key to the whole series, is to find out how we got to where we are. it is a great, great story. >> that was the trailer for "the untold history of the united states." it will air on monday evenings at 8:00 p.m. and is available on demand. oliver stone joins us here in new york, and we are joined by his co-author, peter. we welcome you both to "democracy now." oliver stone, you have been working on this for years, and be announced to people. why? >> it was apri big job for need. i have been working on it for four and a half years. i recently discussed wallace and the bomb at one of his glasses and we ended up talking for about an hour, hour-and-a-half. walla
on the united states by mexico so i thought at the time as a youngster only i had not moral courage enough to resign." grant, of course, in the war was a young lieutenant, and i found this is really moving quote, and that's why it's the title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing that i talked about in the book and i'll talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public in the course of the u.s.-mexico war, not a long war by any means from being really enthuse yays tix and in favor of invading mexico to largely turning in the war, and i see the u.s. mexico war as the moment of america's first anti-war movement actually coming into being so there was anti-war sentiments during the revolution and certainly in the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all deciding that a war that was being more or less successfully waged in another c
to keep in mind where we have been and where we are going. we have 20 women in the united states senate. we have 80 men. there are only 16 democratic women in the senate, and four republican. we have a long, long ways to go. the united states of america was 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the puzzle is to elect pro-choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with are pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of these legislatures, women and men. how m
yesterday and the subject wag illegal in-law units which are present throughout the city and one of the group in the specific area in the city indicated it was his feeling up to 80% of the units there had illegal -- or housing individual housing units there had an illegal unit in it. and i think this is an issue that we have to confront eventually because it's got a lot of -- it's a lot of effects on the entire housing stock. and one of them that came to mind for me is the fact that when there are two units in building it raises the price of building significantly and you really have prices based upon two units, not on one. and it might explain why, when i and starting to practice places in modest homes in the sunset and richmond victor were around 40,000. the increases each in the most pricey areas are 10 times what they were in those days, 10 to maybe 12 times. in places like the sunset and parts of the richmond, they're 20 times. these houses are selling for 800,000. so i'm not saying the total cause of this is secondar secony units, but it does detract from the affordability
the way back to a deal that john lewis and harry truman made in 1946. the united mine workers and i insisted on a new law that we called the coal act protecting 200,000 miners and their families today. we actually helped avert a nationwide coal strike in 1994. in that fight, and so many others, we have been proud to stand with the working men and women of america. steelworkers, teachers, nurses, and everyone deserves a fair wage and a safe place to work with a basic health care. [applause] our country cannot be as great as it should be unless our workers voices are heard and respected. not only by everybody in general, but certainly policymakers. i am just a single-minded about comprehensive health-care reform. i know is not particularly popular in west virginia, but it's ok. because of my fingerprints are all over it, i know is good and i know it will benefit west virginia more than any other state. it is so incredibly complex, not just the 17% of gdp has people like to say, but it is so complex and involved and interests of people, nuances that we just had to do something about it
. if you listen to african american women talk about churches in the united states, you'll hear concerns. you will hear concerns from sisters in islam, a really wonderful group in malaysia talking how to reinterpret the koran so women's integrity is more full-fledged. so it's not really an answer to your question, but it does mean we have a much bigger agenda that if we take religion seriously is to watch a women engage with religion, both state and has organized process and what kind of gender analysis, what the gender analysis show you about the part is of a particular religion in particular places. i know from a serbian feminist friends that there is an enormous alarm now in the reassertion of the serbian orthodox christian church in serbian political life. there is also a lot of of armed amongst russian feminists about the closeness of the putin government to the russian orthodox church now. so you have to watch over time. you have to listen seriously to feminists in any country before you make a function. you have to be curious about how women live their religious lives or nonreligi
ranked as one of the most literate cities in the united states. multiple reading events are happening every night of the year competing against a big names like city arts and lectures. radar was voted the winner of these san francisco contest. after two decades of working for free michelle is able to make radar her full-time job. >> i am a right to myself, but i feel like my work in this world is eagerly to bring writers together and to produce literary events. if i was only doing my own work, i would not be happy. it is, like throwing a party or a dinner party. i can match that person with that person. it is really fun for me. it is nerve wracking during the actual readings. i hope everyone is good. i hope the audience likes them. i hope everybody shows up. but everything works out. at the end of the reading, everyone is happy. ♪ shortly. >> if you would like to speak on an agendized item please fill out a speaker card and when speaking before the commission, do state your name for the record. at this time, i'd like to take roll. commission president fong, here
in for his second term as the 44th president of the united states. good morning. i'm gwen eiffel and welcome to his pbs news hour special coverage of today's nailingration. >> i'm jeffrey brown. it's a bright sunny day here in washington. temperatures remain in the 30's. that's a bit warmer than four years ago for the president's first inauguration. that of course saw a record-setting crowd, nearly 2 million people. no one is expecting anything quite like that this time around but still, folks have been finding spaces on the mall tonight since the sun came up. you can see them setting up spots now. we will be covering the entire inaugural ceremony live. and if you're not at your tv you can watch our live stream on our home page at news hour.pbs.org or follow us on twitter. >> this earmarks the 150th anniversary of the man'spation proclamation. you can see bill and hillary clinton on the podium. there are also people there celebrating the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first preside
use or if they are dangerous and unusual weapons. that was a dichotomy set up by the united states supreme court. if they are in common use like handguns we have to go to the second step of the analysis. if they are dangerous and unusual weapons like machine gun, the analysis would stop there. assault weapons are pretty commonplace. they become popular and firearms in a gun rights community. there are apparently tens of millions of these firearms out there, arguably they are commonly used, but one argument is while they are common they are not commonly used for the core purpose of the second amendment, self-defense. they are poor self-defense weapons. it is hard to maneuver in the home, and projectiles are propelled of such a rate they are likely to pose dangers and who people as they go through walls, endangering family members or neighbors. if that is right, assault weapons would not be thought to be within the scope of the second amendment, and yet i should admit we talked extensively that there are some reasonable arguments you could make against an assault weapons ban. an assa
specific importance to the united states we understand, as was for us the issue of sovereignty and the tensions and the continued presence of international forces in afghan villages and the conduct of the war itself. with those issues resolved, as we did today, the rest was done earlier, i can go to the afghan people and argue for immunity for u.s. troops in afghanistan in a way that afghan sovereignty will not be compromised, in a way that afghan law will not be compromised, in a way that the provisions that we arrive at through our talks will give the united states the satisfaction of what it seeks, and will also provide the afghan people the benefit that they are seeking through this partnership and the subsequent agreement. [indiscernible] that is not for us to decide. it is an issue for the united states. numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it is the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. the specifics of numbers are issues that the military will decide and afghanistan will have no p
years. >>> defense secretary leon panetta will announce an historic change for the united states military today. the pentagon will lift its ban on women serving in combat roles. susan mcginnis has more. >> reporter: the new pentagon policy makes women eligible to serve in army and marine infantry units. there's also the potential for them to be a part of elite special operations teams, like the navy seals and delta force. victoria rivers was a machine gunner who went on missions with special ops forces. >> working side by side with special forces team, it was pretty cool. >> reporter: but in order to join, women must be able to meet the rigid strength and stamina requirements of those units. >> there's jobs that women can't do physically, because they just don't have the strength, the physical strength to do it. >> reporter: by lifting the combat exclusion policy, the pentagon is opening the door to more women being killed or wounded in action. combat operations in iraq and afghanistan have cost more than 130 women their lives, and more than 800 have been wounded. dawn commanded
for congress extending the borrowing authority of the united states. >> will they roll it out. >> you can speculate about a lot of things, but there's not-- nothing needs to come to these kinds of, you know, speculative notion about how to deal with a problem easily resolved by congress doing its job. very simply, since treasury, i believe, overseas printing and minting, you might ask treasury. >> at no point in-- >> and joining me now the chairman of the south carolina democratic party and mark theeson, enterprise institute and former speech writer for george w. bush. if congress doesn't give him the authority to raise the debt limit, he has the end around it with the trillion dollar coin he could just sort of say is there and allows him to spend more because we have this extra savings to really boil it down. mark, your thoughts? >> this, this may be one of the stupidest ideas ever to come out of washington and that's saying something. it's not clear it's legal. edward moy, under bush and obama may say it's legal to print a trillion dollars platinum coin, it doesn't have a trillion dolla
could pass into law here in the united states, here in washington, d.c.? >> host: blair levin, you talk two different platforms in your book, "the politics abundance." what are those platforms? >> guest: the basic idea is how do we drive abundance by looking at the areas that absorb a lot of private cap tag -- capital, and they can drive productivity not just in those sector, but throughout the entire economy. and the two we're really focused on are what we call the power platform, the energy grid needs to be redone, and the knowledge platform. we don't -- we need to do some work on the networks of what we call knowledge, which is to say broadband, but it's really about how do we apply it, how do we deliver bandwidth that can really change education, change health care, change all government services so we get faster, cheaper, better? the same kind of phenomenon that we see on our phones and our or networks we want to see if public goods and services like education and health care. >> host: well, as a former executive director of the national broadband plan, mr. levin, how important is
, wicked, jekyll & hyde all getting together at the end of this month raise money for the united way. >> bill: good for them. good for them. thank you dan. yes, indeed, an historic day at the white house. i got out of my sickbed to go down for the announcement in the east room. president obama coming out at 1:10 and announcing the final two members of the national security team. last week he nominated john kerry, a great choice to be secretary of state. yesterday, he presented to the world his next two picks. >> obama: to help meet the challenges of our time, i'm proud to announce my choice for two key members of my national security team. chuck hagel for secretary of defense and john brennan for directorror of the central intelligence agency. >> bill: the president was adamant in his praise of hagel who the president befriended when he was a member of the senate traveled with him to iraq and afghanistan, got to know him as independent centrist moderate, republican. and was willing to stand up to the leaders of his own party and say they were wrong. originally voted for the war in ir
city, defense secretary leon panetta announced the united states military will no longer ban women from serving on the front lines of war. and open up hundreds of thousands of fighting jobs for women service members. the decision reverses the 1994 rule that restricted women from combat roles, even though women frequently found themselves in direct combat in iran and in afghanistan. many fought and died there, in fact, those wars led to the deaths of 152 american service women. the defense secretary leon panetta today said that not everybody will become a combat soldier, but that everyone is entitled to a chance. >> i go on to bethesda to visit wounded warriors and i've gone to arlington to bury our dead, there is no distinction that's made between the sacrifices of men and women in uniform. they serve the wounded and they die right next to each other. >> shepard: the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff recommended the move and the bipartisan group of lawmakers says it supports the lifting of the ban, but critics say they do have some concerns, including the republican congressman and
. who gets privilege of becoming a citizen of the united states of america. that's a big deal. when we talk about that in the abstract, it's easy sometimes for the discussion to take on a feeling of us versus them. and when that happens, a lot of folks forget that most of us used to be them. [chuckles] >> we forget that [applause] it's really important foritous remember our history. unless you are one of the first americans, a native american, you came from someplace else. somebody brought you. [cheers and applause] you know, ken salazar, he's of mexican-american dissent, but his family's been living where he lives for 400 years. so he didn't immigrate anywhere. the irish, who left behind a land of famine, the germans who fled persecution, the scandinavians who arrived eager to pioneer out west, the polish, the russians, the italgian, the chinese, the japanese, the west indians, the huddled masses who came from ellis island on one coast and angel island on the other... [applause] all those folks, before they were us, they were them. and when each new wave of immigrants, they faced from
. it provides opportunities for residents on either sides of the border. united states border, mexican border. when we provide that, things start falling into place. you see a reduction in crime, reduction in drug use. that's what this discussion today and we thank simon increasing for putting the fund is so important because it allows us to move forward and some of the things i think you heard and discussed, we need to increase or border infrastructure and implement a firm but fair immigration policy. we need to encourage more u.s. cities and mexican city partnerships to allow us to facilitate that trade discussed earlier. earlier in 2011, 2013, las cruces named the champion of change because we were able to show why in the southwest we've been able to increase profit and personnel in a tough and challenging time. during that time, we listened to many officials to me upon the best ration and the president said he wanted to increase trade with mexico. but that type of mandate and this type of forum, you'll see more and more trade with mexico. i appreciate you all coming out today. we eagerly
>> barack obama is projected to be the next president of the united states. >> tonight ofrontline... >> they thought success would breed success. >> we'll move for a quick kill-- that's how they referred to it, "a quick kill on capitol hill." >> their leadership told the members, "no, just say no." >> there was a polarizing quality about barack obama that came roaring forward. >> he was in a position to make demands, and he didn't. >> he's the first nobel peace prize winner with a kill list. >> i think he understands that the glory days are over and everything's going to be more challenging. >> now he gets another chance to be the guy who united the country. >> in the week before his inauguration, a look back "inside obama's presidency." >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.
[cheers and applause] >> it is my distinct honor to present the chief justice of the united states, the honorable john roberts was administered the oath of office. everyone, please stand. >> are you prepared to take the oath, senator? >> i am. >> i, barack obama, do solemnly swear that i will execute the presidency of the united states and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states so help me god. >> congratulations, mr. president. [cheers and applause] [fanfare sounds] ♪ [playing "presidential march"] [cannons firing] [cheers and applause] >> it is my great honor to present the 44th president of these united states, barack obama. [cheers and applause] [crowd chanting "obama"] >> thank you. thank you. my fellow citizens, i stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. i thank president bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition. 44 americans have now taken th
the united states of america! [cheers and applause] >> goodach, everyone. we just watched as president obama pushed his plan for immigration reform in las vegas. coming just one day after the senate beat him to the punch, announcing its bipartisan proposal. president obama making remarks in las vegas. the president called for granting a path to citizenship for the estimated 11 million people in the united states, currently illegally. he praised the senate's efforts in announcing an immigration proposal yesterday. that plan had a key provision, requiring tighter border security before any illegal immigrants could get citizenship. that was key to republican support. it also calls for beefing up border security and punishments for businesses that hire illegal immigrants. republicans say they will not sign off on any immigration reform that doesn't put border security first. let's go to carl cameron in washington. how do you break this down? is there a big difference from what you heard from president obama, compared to the bipartisan commission of eight senators yesterday? we heard a lot more f
people and the united states but of the entire region. and finally we reaffirmed the strategic partnership we signed last year in kabul, an enduring partnership between two sovereign nations. this includes deepening ties with trade, commerce, strengthening institutions, development, education, and opportunities for all afghans. men and women, boys and girls. and this sends a clear message to afghans and to the region as afghans stand up they will not stand alone. the united states and the world stands with them. now, let me close by saying that this continues to be a very difficult mission. our forces continue to serve and make tremendous sacrifices every day. the afghan people make significant sacrifices every day. afghan forces still need to grow stronger. we remain vigilant against insider attacks. lasting peace and security will require governance and development that delivers for the afghan people and an end to safe havengs for al qaeda and its ilk. all this will continue to be our work. but make no mistake. our path is clear and we are moving forward. every day more afgha
that cannot be cured by what is right with america. >> the united states will not ignore your oppression or excuse your oppressors. >> all are equal. all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. >>> the presidential inauguration is getting under way right here on the capitol, and we have a front row seat. >> here on the national mall, people are staking out their spot to experience this moment in history. >> the sun rises on barack obama's second term. >> we gather because we have chosen hope over fear. unity over purpose. >> on this day, a public celebration of the presidency after a private oath the day before. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >> on this capitol where so many battles have been fought and will be fought, political rivalries are being set aside in a show of democracy and unity for all the world to see. >> and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. >>> we're live here on the west front of the united states capitol for one of the grandest celebration
for the president of the united states. hopkins, whether true or not, some say it is not. hawkins timed out or not story for years. he was a gambler, a bettercombo courses and cars, even the time of day. very three times. between his second and third marriages, dated glamorous women. movie stars like pollock gothard, restores the hail, who jumped from her ethics house apart in new york to her death allegedly because she had been jilted by harry hopkins. the former paris editor of the harper's bazaar, who he married on the second floor of the white house in the summer of 1942. he regarded money, his own and other peoples of a thing to be spent as quickly as possible. put people into two categories. talkers and doers. kerry was definitely a doer. "the hopkins touch" the book begins may 10 to 1840, a year and a half before the united states got into the secular world were. it was the day with the germans overran the low countries and hitler's division were masked in the forest and poised to invade a verge and phrases. it was the day and then they can, 1940, when winston churchill became prime
karzai. we're there for the benefit of the united states. as long as there is a threat that comes from afghanistan, al qaeda, as long as afghanistan could be in the future used as a potential safe haven against people in the united states, we're there, we have to recognize that we're there.safee united states, we're there, we have to recognize that we're there. and we have to remember first principles. we're there for the defense of the american mainland and american people. >> always good to get your thoughts. appreciate it, sir. >> take care. >>> in december russias passed a law banning u.s. adoptions. that left hundreds in limbo wondering what were happening to the children they were already in the process of adopting. now there may be some hope for those people. >>> one problem after another this week if boeing 787 dream liner. now the u.s. government weighing in. >>> also coming up, it is the first and only exhibition of its kind to ever tour the united states featuring 150 mummies. fr r. clear, huh? i'm not juice or fancy water. i've got nine grams of protein. that's three times
to the next president of the united states. this was a different man. >> there are tens of thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands who have gathered in grant park in chicago. >> ladies and gentlemen, the next first family of the united states of america. >> narrator: only four years earlier, he'd been a state legislator. >> the look on his face to me looked like someone who finally understood the weight of the job that he had just won. >> almost as if the weight of the world had rested on his shoulders. >> the road ahead will be long, our climb will be steep. two wars, a planet in peril, the worst financial crisis in a century. but america, i have never been more hopeful than i am tonight that we will get there. i promise you, we as a people will get there. god bless you, and may god bless the united states of america. >> narrator: if he had any idea that night how difficult this would be, the next day would prove it. >> so much for that election day euphoria... >> the economy has now lost 650,000 jobs just in the past three months... >> all eyes are now on barack obama to turn it around...
the president of the united states. hopkins, whether true or not, some say it's not, hopkins behind out on that story for years. he was a gambler on horses and cars, even the time of day. married three times, between the second and third marriages, he dated glamorous womenhave movie stars like paulette goddard, actress dorothy hale, who actually she jumped from her apartment in new york to her death, allegedly because she had been jilted by harry hopkins. the former paris editor of the harper's bazaar, who he married actually on the second floor of the white house the summer of 1942. he regarded money, his own and other people's as something to be spent as quickly as possible. to put people into two categories. talkers and doers. and harry was definitely a do or. so the hopkins touch, the book, begins on may 10, 1940, and that was a year and half before the united states get into the second world war. it was a day when the germans overran the low countries and hitler's panzer division of tanks were masked in our dense forests, poised to invade luxembourg and france. it was a day that wi
at that united states anti-doping agency report, it says that there were 38 blood samples taken from lance armstrong between 2009 and 2011 when he was making that comeback in the tour de france, and it showed blood levels with values with the likelihood of occurring naturally in less than 1 in a million. so a great deal of questions will be raised as lance armstrong continues to assert that he rode those last two years cleanly. there's a great deal of speculation about that. erin? >> thanks, ed. now i want to bring in our penl. david epstein is a senior writer for "sports illustrated." dana jacobson is with cbs sports and paul callan is our legal contributor. you were all critical last night. you didn't feel satisfied. let me ask you, did you feel that -- did he win you another tonight? >> no. and i said earlier there's probably no way he could have won me over. maybe i saw a little more human side when his kids were mentioned. he was -- oprah said do you owe people an apology and he listed the people he owes an apology to, and he didn't do it last night when he had a chance. he didn't do
. >>> all right. the united states marine corps band is now going by the reviewing stand. the president is there with the co comb don't of the u.s. marine corps. now it's the marines. it's the marines turn. so you know what, let's pay homage. let's respect the united states marines. ♪ ♪ that is a beautiful shot. the u.s. marine corps being honored. now the chinese-american community center folk dance troupe from delaware, the home state of the vice president of the united states. we're getting a little different cultural -- this is a little cultural dancing. but who knew they were from delaware, these dancers have performed, by the way, not only here, but the kennedy center, the smithsonian, the wilmington brand opera house, play house theater, national theater. this is an excellent, excellent folk dance troupe. >> as you look close, you can see these people are working really hard as they're approaching. this is the tail end of their parade as they get to the reviewing stand so they're really working hard. >> they haven't had a lot of time to practice. the election ended, then the
of people scattered around the hospital's different departments, as well as the intensive care units who have not been identified yet. it isn't a big number, but the people waiting outside for news are desperate. >> it was the end of the summer holiday season in brazil, the last chance to party for many young people due back at work or school on monday. shasta darlington, cnn, santa maria, brazil. >>> if you can believe it, that was 10 years ago. susan canned otte has been looking back at fires in recent history. >> in 2003, 100 people died at the station nightclub in west warwick, rhode island where the band great white was performing. pyrotechnics ignited material and smoke filled the room. arson was the cause of the happy land fire in new york approximately it killed 87 people. authorities said the bronx club was operating illegally, two years after it was ordered closed because of safety violations. in 1977, fire at the beverly hills supper club in kentucky killed 165 people. it was believed to be an electrical fire went undetected at first. no fire detectors. and the coconut grove i
diversity, that we have not seen before in the united states congress. interesting statistic is that among democrats in the house, white males will not be the majority any more of the democratic conference. that's the first time that has happened. we have an african-american republican appointed to the united states senate. that the first time we have had an african-american republican in the senate since 1970s, early 1980s i believe. clearly you are looking at a different group of folks in terms who've is represented up here. the problem is, they are having the same problems to deal with once they're sworn in. we have seen the swearings in going on all day, sue. >> thank you very much. congress might be be able to get much done but ty can get it done. he is at manager of the year conference and awards in chicago. ty? >> sue, i was just thinking, if you don't have to be a member of house to be speaker of house be i nominate jon stewart. >>> we are back for manager of the year awards presentation. basically golden globes, oscars, emmys of the hedge funds business. who would have turned a $1
, but in a sustainable way. the united states should want to lead in how we do that. >> in the politics of abundance, there are several instances where you saved the president could act on his own without congressional approval. what are some of those instances? >> for example, in the area of education, the sector of education -- it is a question of how we accelerate it? the president working with the department of education could create a data exchange system that allows us to personalize education. there is a similar thing with healthcare. the president could use executive authority and lay the foundation and act to accelerate that movement to the digital platform. >> where does congress come in? >> in a number of places. at the end of the book, we lay out for trades we think congress could take part. one is related to the broadband area. there was a ceo council that suggested that there are trillions of dollars of savings if the government moved all of its business services to the digital platform. what we proposed is a commission is where you get ceos in a room, make them look at those problems
fire damage to the battery of the auxiliary power unit. remember, the auxiliary power unit is what is used to provide power to an airplane when it is parked on the tarmac, not while it's in flight so the battery unit, severe fire kagge there, and it's pretty clear, scott and maria, that we are going to see more airlines, if they haven't already, they are going to start checking their wiring on the battery unit. i just spoke with the folks out of ana in japan. they have a number of dreamliners, checked theirs overnight at the urging of the ministry of transportation in j.i just talked with united airlines. it has checked the battery power wiring on all of its dreamliners, all six of them. the "wall street journal" reports that one of them did not have the wiring done properly, so that's clearly where the investigation is headed regarding those dreamliners and the fire we saw yesterday in boston. back to you. >> thanks. certainly will continue watching that story. boeing a dreadful couple of days as a result of this and traded already more than two times its average daily volume as a
personnel, ready for this event. we have snipers on the roofs. we have biological and chemical units prepared to deal with whatever comes up. we have a high degree of surveillance. satellites zooming in on the mall, as well as hundreds of surveillance cameras, to watch potential suspects. as one official told me last night, we have no specific threat. but we have to be ready for anything, george. >> and i know they've been preparing for this for a year. they've been locking the buildings on the parade route. they've been locking the garbage cans on the parade route. repaved the road. they are taking no chances. we have an incredible team of presidential savvy with us this morning. i want a quick word from two of them sitting with us here. let's start with matthew dowd, contributor to abc news. you have contributed to a combine, as well. both sides of the aisle. what does it take for a president to take a second inauguration and make it soaring? >> well, it's a much different situation when you go from the first to the second. the first one, everybody's filled with hope. we can make c
and this fight has moved from northern and west africa to great britain and the united states. the chairman of the house foreign affairs committee called this a growing radical movement and supports the offensive and he is outfront tonight. thank you for taking the time. i appreciate it. the islamist military commander who we spoke to said they demand an end to the war to release the hostages. we are hearing this attack has been in the works before the french formalal involvement. should the united states be negotiating with these al qaeda linked groups? >> here is the difficulty and you have done great reporting on this. for the last six years this particular al qaeda affiliate has been taking westerners hostages and have been using this for bargaining power. they then use the monetary ransom in order to build their organization. they are also freshly supplied from some of the weapons that they picked up in libya. so we have a situation, frankly, where i think we have to hope that the french foreign legion forces and other forces engage and make very quick progress. i say that because once
is that the united states government now spends more on immigration enforcement than on all other principal law enforcement agencies combined. we are spending as of fiscal year 2011, which is the most recent year for the data that we're using that was available, that's the price tag of $18 billion. that is 24% greater than the $14.4 billion that funds the f.b.i., the d.e.a., the secret service, the a.t.f. and the u.s. marshal service. this is a historic reversal, because in 1986 when this all began, i.n.s. comprised 28% of the spending of all of the other law enforcement agencies. and if you look at page 22 of your engineering manual, you will see a graph that very clearly shows this and what a historic change has taken place over this period of time. border enforcement by far is the largest share of this spending. it's the largest spending for everything in the immigration system, all of the other immigration functions, and among other things it's made possible the doubling of the border patrol in just the last eight years from $10,819 to where it stands today which is in the neighborhood of 2
concentrated and very sedentary. so about 10% of all the people in the united states own about 80% of the guns. they're mostly middle class, middle-aged people living in rural areas, and they hold on to their guns for a long time. on the other hand, most of the people engaged in crime are teens and young adults. one of the -- and most criminal careers are short. and so one of the things that that means is that there's always a new generation of young people who are troying to solve the problem -- who are trying to solve the problem fresh of getting their hands on guns. and i think one way that you could think about the challenger here or the situation here is you could think about the united states being just like a giant bathtub filled with 300 million guns. we don't need to worry about the entire tub, we just feed to worry about -- we just need to worry about the drain, trying to divert the guns away from the high-risk hands. the one other thing that i want to mention for the conversation right now is we have a bunch of stuff going on at the federal level, and we have a bunch of states tryin
the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the united states government until may 19, 2013, and for other purposes. mr. reid: i would ask for a second reading but object to my own request. the presiding officer: objection is heard. the bill will be read for the second time on the next legislative day. mr. reid: mr. president, i now ask unanimous consent that the appointments at the desk appear separately in the record as if made by the chair. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mr. reid: i now ask unanimous consent that when the senate completes its business today, it adjourn until 2:00 p.m. on monday, january 28. that following the prayer and pledge, the morning business be deemed expired, the journal of proceedings be approved to date and the time for the two leaders be reserved for their use later in the day, and the senate proceed to a period of morning business until 4:30 p.m., that senators be permitted to speak during that period of time for up to ten minutes. further, following morning business, the senate proceed to h.r. 152 under the previous ord
to undergo a background check and pay a fine and back taxes before gaining legal status in the united states. all that is contingent on securing borders. the proposal provides for increased use of drones, more personnel and improved infrastructure and it would create an employment verification system and improve the process for admitting needed workers. cnn chief congressional correspondent dana bash and cnn chief white house correspondent jessica yellin are working the story. dana, the tone was pretty optimistic up on capitol hill today. >> it sure was but, you know, we have seen this movie before, you and i, wolf, and a lot of other people watching this issue go kind of up and down with the partisan wins. but this is something that is different this time. because of something very simple. and that is what happened in the last election to republicans. particularly mitt romney with the latino voters. he lost big time. and that's why when i asked senator mccain and others who were standing right here where i'm standing, half a dozen years ago, why this is different, that's why they answered t
to women. the new pentagon policy makes women eligible to serve in army and marine infantry units. there's also the potential for them to be a part of an elite special operations team like the navy s.e.a.l.s and delta force. >> she went on special missions working side by side with special forces. >> it was pretty cool. >> but in order to join women must be able to withstand the rigid strength and standard requirements with those units. >> there are jobs women can't do physically because they don't have the physical strength to do it. >> the pentagon is opening the >> by lifting the combat ban execution, the pentagon is opening its door to more women being killed or wounded in action. conflicts have cost more than 130 women their lives and more than 800 have been wounded. dawn halfacre lost her arm fighting alongside an infantry unit. >> there's not a big difference at all. and a lot of the missions we did we did with infantry units, we would do with shelled artillery units. we were all fighting the same thing, doing the same thing. >> this is the executive direc
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